Ragda Pattis, Lassi and Sevpuri

Every evening we take Meera for a walk. Its just a few blocks to the local Maruti temple on Colaba Causeway. After darshan, we invariably stop by Kailash Parbat for some chaat. The bestest!

The Pani puri is best savored at the counter outside, where you stand and the bhaiyya dishes out the puri faster than you can gulp them. With Meera in tow, it is easier to sit inside and keep her occupied with some puffed rice, while we munch on our other favorites. I stick to what I like: Ragda Pattis and a Meetha Lassi – with a dollop of malai on top! M ordered the Sev puri.
Bon apetit!

Ragda pattis lassi Kailash Parbat Colaba


Kailash Parbat in previous posts

Pav Bhaji & Chole Bhatura
Pav Bhaji Kailash Parbat Colaba

 
 
 
 
 

How to eat a Paani Puri
How to eat Paani Puri Kailash Parbat Colaba

 
 
 
 
 

Ragda Pattis & Lassi (2004)
Ragda Pattis Lassi Kailash Parbat Colaba

Street Food: Seafood in Salzburg

Salzburg is a very artistic city. Everything here is named after its favorite son, Mozart: statues, banners, chocolates, t-shirts, buses and every lamp post! A stone’s throw from his birth place, we did find this eatery with nothing named Mozart.

The seafood arrayed here was sufficient to make any fish lover (Konkani) giddy with joy. And trust the Austrians to present the fish, surgically clean. Before you start to curse me, we did not try any of this – see, we had just finished a beautiful Austrian breakfast and were in no mood for seafood. But delicious no? (see more pics below).
pictures of seafood in Salzburg Austria by Arun Shanbhag Continue reading “Street Food: Seafood in Salzburg”

Street Food: Alaskan Killer Shrimp

If these get you salivating, blame Sia who is hosting Street food Festivities!


After psychedelic uttapams from Murugan Idli in Chennai, I’ll zip you around the globe to Alaska for some spicy Killer Shrimp.

Last year this week in Alaska, we marveled in awe at Glaciers, and ooohed and aaahed at antics of humpback whales and those colorful, darling puffins. En route in Anchorage, we snacked on these Killer Shrimp freshly prepared at an open air stall – the closest you’ll get to street food in the US.

A mother and daughter team fried giant shrimp in butter and a medley of spices.

Continue reading “Street Food: Alaskan Killer Shrimp”

Shanbhag Fastfood

During one of our trips through Karnataka, we visited Hampi to see the ancient city of Vijayanagar. What a fascinating city! Under a UNESCO mandate, extensive restorations are ongoing. The temples are awe inspiring! But for M, the best part of the trip was our stay in the nearby town of Hospet. A busy, dusty town at the crossroads of the Manganese ore trade. Here we made camp at the “Shanbhag International.” There was nothing international about this place. Even by Indian standards, it was an average “Hotel,” but importantly it had a few air-conditioned rooms. Continue reading “Shanbhag Fastfood”

Butta – Roasted Maize

As you noticed I've been posting random pics from my collection! Work is crazy busy – and will be till we leave for mumbai in ten days. A short, one week visit for a family wedding, followed by a week touring the austrian and swiss alps.

I think I'll go on a mango diet in mumbai Anyone want to go mango shopping to crawford market?

pics of charcoal roasted maize corn by Arun Shanbhag
Every summer, after I've had my fill of mangoes, my eyes search for the butta wallah. Maize (or corn) roasted on an open charcoal shekdi (grill); then liberally smeared with a halved lemon, dabbed in salt and red-pepper powder! The butta season peaks as the monsoon starts, causing folks to huddle by the warmth of the shekdi.

One of my favorites here too. Weather permitting, I roast corn on the gas-fired grill. My local friends have never encountered this confluence of zing and zang on their corn, but are quickly converted. And as at the butta wallah, roasted corn is best served on the husk!

Bademiya: Colaba's Culinary Firmament

Its the street food that makes Mumbai special! From the chana-wallahs at Gateway, to ganna-wallahs and paan-wallahs, seemingly at every corner; and the vada-paav baakdas at Fountain. And of course, Bademiya in the seedy gulli behind the Taj Mahal Hotel. Continue reading “Bademiya: Colaba's Culinary Firmament”

How to eat Paani Puri

How to eat Paani Puri at Kailash Parbat Pics by Arun Shanbhag

When visiting relatives confessed they had never eaten paani puri at a street stall, I was aghast. They had only eaten pani puri at nice, sterile hygienic restaurants!!! Where the puris, fillings and chutneys are served in a multitude of tiny saucers, you mix it all yourself, spoon the paani and eat. Sacrilege! Is that any way to enjoy paani puri?

So I herded them to Kailash Parbat in Colaba's 1st Pasta Lane. This is how you eat paani puri! At an outdoor stall, the bhayya pokes the puri with his thumb, scoops the filling, dunks it in a large pot of spicy jeera paani and flops the dripping puri on your plate. All in one fluid motion. You just have to stuff it in your mouth. Be quick to gulp, coz the next one is on the way! After the last one, … you slurp the paani.

How tasty? See the girl in the back licking her fingers? Yes, that good! Then you head over to the other side for a lassi or rabri! 🙂

When we were kids, a pot-bellied maharaj with no shirt, held court. Now with “India Shining,” this puny guy is serving with gloves! Instead of a terracotta matka they have a steel pot. But still tasty!

The only address you need to know for a good Paani Puri.
Best place for chaat in Mumbai Colaba Pics by Arun Shanbhag


Kailash Parbat in previous posts

Pav Bhaji & Chole Bhatura
Pav Bhaji Kailash Parbat Colaba

 
 
 
 
 

Ragda Pattis, Lassi & Sevpuri
Ragda pattis lassi Kailash Parbat Colaba

 
 
 
 
 

Ragda Pattis & Lassi (2004)

Kumta: Main Street


The Vegetable market sits on one end of main street also called “paent” in Kumta. The stores are tiny and carry whatever you would need. Nothing fancy here, just life's essentials. Several temples are on this street, thus flower sellers everywhere.

Notice the reddish tinged road. That comes from the red Laterite rock this entire Konkan region sits atop. In the konkan, everything is made from laterite: buildings, fence walls, bus-stop shelters, stores and even road side gutters. Crushed laterite gravel is used on the shoulders of all roads. Even the dust has a reddish tinge and so does the normally black asphalt road. After a few days here white clothes include a tinge of red.

A stroll down Main Street
The Venkateshwara Devasthan/Muth is in the center of town. I love exploring the inside of this beautiful, old temple. Piles of sand and gravel outside point to imminent construction; pray nothing gaudy.

Nearby is the Shanteri Kamakshi Temple. A thread-ceremony was going on inside and these girls, dressed in new clothes, were welcoming guests. Women received flower strands for their hair, men (and women) got sprinkled with perfumed water. Note the girl in red reaching for the chrome sprinkler.

After walking in the hot sun, my cousin and I decided to gate-crash this ceremony for some cool lemonade and mithai. We smiled at the girls, got doused in perfumed water and smiled our way to the back of the temple where the lemonade was still being mixed. There as we waited, the assistant picked up a block of ice sitting on the bare floor and tossed it in the giant pot” I had no intention of getting an upset stomach at the start of my holidays. Mithai too was nowhere to be seen. After bowing my head at the shrine, we departed.

Right outside the temple I tried taking a pic of the squatting flower-seller, and this women walked right into my field. Her expression suggests she was carrying a huge burden on her already drooping shoulders.

Parched throats had us dash to the corner shop with the red and white awning (Nayak's Cold drinks). Note the women selling an assortment of flowers, vegetables or fruits. Generally whatever grows on their plot.

On the back table as we waited to order Limbu-soda, a local person still sitting there was sipping, what looked like a glass of cold-coffee. Raagi Neeru (Nanchane udak) he noted. I remembered my grandmother making Raagi Neeru for us kids playing in the hot summer sun. Apparently the owner's wife makes it at home – delicious. They also served Teela Udak (white sesame water). Had to try that as well. After a few glasses of each, we were well prepared to brave the midday sun. Note empty glasses on table.

Apparently a very simple recipe for these cool-drinks. Roasted Nanchane or white sesame seeds are ground with some coconut gratings, jaggery and water. Thats it. Ayurveda experts would swear at how it would 'cool' the body from the inside. Amen!


Other Kumta Related Posts:

Get a paan and some fruits

This paan-wallah has been serving customers near our house for as long as I can remember. His day starts at 6:30am, when he bathes at an outdoor water tank and scrubs his pots to a gleaming sheen. Then washes all the paan. As kids we used to reach over and grab some of the 'sweet paan masala' on the way to school. After Sunday fish curry lunch, we would all get paan and act like grown-ups – chewing and spitting out the juice through reddened teeth. Even now I ask for my, “ek mitha paan banana, katri supari, chuna kum” His wife lives in Uttar Pradesh. He would take a month off each year and visit her (what sacrifice). Now his three sons help at this stall and run other stalls of their own.

Here he is preparing for some of his early customers. The fruitwallah from the stall behind is posing as well.

The yellow cast is from the funky tarpaulin to protect from the blazing sun and occasional downpour


The Fruit Stall. Another pic from an earlier trip two years ago. In both, a taxi awaits and people walk by. Fruit-wallah brags that the blemish-free, ruby red pomegranates were imported from Kabul. So I got those to support the Afghani farmers in addition to my regular sitaaphal.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑