Video: How to do a Pec Fly & Chest Press

I don’t do weights! But my trainer friends urge me to build muscle tone. “It will help your running,” they argue. I do anything which helps my running.
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Yoga of Running: Tough Mile 1

running yoga distance running, marathons
You’d think, after completing several marathons, running comes easy to me. Well, once I get going, I do enjoy it. But getting started on any run is always tough. Particularly Mile 1. I am not talking about a 1 mile sprint. Just the first mile of a long or short run. Its a tough mile!

I have stretched; sipped water and I head out the door. Reset the stopwatch; push off and go.

In about a 100 meters, I am panting! My mouth is wide open and my chest is heaving. My breathing is very labored and you could hear my gasps 20 feet away. My legs feel all wrong and my arms are like clumsy appendages. I wonder, are my lungs ok? I really cannot go on for another hour like this.

My legs feel wobbly. No pain, just completely uncoordinated. Like a toddler taking her first steps. Nothing grossly wrong. My feet are not splayed wide like a duck’s. I have the right shoes on and laces are tight. Knees don’t hurt.

My hips reluctantly and erratically swinging forward; pushing my knees ahead – seemingly uncontrollably. Hamstrings fire and decide how far my knee goes. Muscles and tendons in my calf are grudgingly lifting my ankle and projecting the foot forward. My foot is still learning how to land. Unsure where to take the load – should my ankle flex and land on the heel, or on the flat, or on the ball of my foot. Terrain is still alien and the pace, who knows. As my hips swing forward, my opposite arm is swinging back and my hands and fingers seem unsure of what to do. They are itching to do something, just not sure what.

No pain, just that odd feeling inside: this is so damn uncoordinated! So grace-less!

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Running the Boston Marathon!

Yoooo Hooo! After many attempts, I am finally entered in the 110th running of the Boston Marathon on April 17th, 2006.

It is the most prestigious and the oldest, continuously running marathon in the world. Don't know about the continuous running bit. I plan on intermittently walking, limping, and even crawling to the finish line. Considered one of the toughest marathons, because of the infamous “Heartbreak” hill at mile 21, which claims many runners. And the 4-month training coincides with the worst of Boston's winter.

The good part, I got to buy cool new shoes! And I get to eat whatever I want, and a WHOLE lot more! I need to more than double my food intake, which btw in NOT FUN! Food is not a tasty treat anymore, but fuel for running. Thus eating is as fun as filling gas in the car. I am nauseated at the mere thought of eating!

My training has been going well, despite the lack of cooperation from mother nature (see running experience below). My days are planned around eating and running. And managing the pain after wards. My new motto is: Pain is Constant! It complements well my earlier motto: Human Existence IS Suffering. BTW, I am not a pessimist. I believe if human existence IS indeed suffering, then we should seize every opportunity to fully enjoy the brief glimmers of fun and joy, and not be crushed when things take a bad turn. Seems to work for me!

Here's my Saturday running experience. I had to run 16 miles and with the wind howling, it was a frigid 15 deg F (-9.5 deg C). I bundled up in layers of micro-fleece and wind-bloc. My face was still uncovered and the frigid air I breathed in, shocked my lungs! 30 minutes into the run, my fully-charged iPOD battery froze and died! This is the pits and I considered giving up! About an hour into the run, the water in the bottle I was carrying froze, and turned into an icy slurry! I managed a few sips of grit. Snot from my nose had frozen solid on my upper lip. Looking cool was certainly not a priority – getting one foot in front of the other was! I saw a few other hard-core runners – fellow marathon trainers, I surmised. We would wave and silently congratulate each other.

Two hours and 40 minutes later (averaging 10 min a mile), I returned and collapsed on my front steps. Guzzled about a liter of (warm) water and a liter of lemonade!

My evening was spent watching the winter olympics while I iced various parts of my knee and leg. Even walking a few steps is excruciating. Like I said earlier, Pain is the only constant! Nearly seven more weeks remain!

As I get closer to the date, I will provide a link where you can keep up with my progress during the run. My goal is to just finish – standing (or crawling) in under five hours!

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